NPR

8 runners take on the 2014 Boston Marathon

demi clark

At the airport, waiting for an early flight home to Charleston. We had a chance to visit the finish at sunrise this AM — just before the workers ripped the vinyl up. What a moment. How overwhelming — literally, figuratively, physically. Boston gets to move on today. I’m so grateful to NPR for inviting me to be a part of this project. I’m grateful to the others in the “NPR8” for their strength, honesty and transparency in their journey here. Most of all, I’m grateful to the beautiful city of Boston. Such love, such life. A victorious day for all yesterday. Boston, I’m so happy you got your day back. Today, you are the strongest city in the world. Forever in my Southern-girl heart!
— Demi Clark

At the airport, waiting for an early flight home to Charleston. We had a chance to visit the finish at sunrise this AM — just before the workers ripped the vinyl up. What a moment. How overwhelming — literally, figuratively, physically. Boston gets to move on today. I’m so grateful to NPR for inviting me to be a part of this project. I’m grateful to the others in the “NPR8” for their strength, honesty and transparency in their journey here. Most of all, I’m grateful to the beautiful city of Boston. Such love, such life. A victorious day for all yesterday. Boston, I’m so happy you got your day back. Today, you are the strongest city in the world. Forever in my Southern-girl heart!

— Demi Clark

Thinking of our daughters today on Easter. This is them yesterday — giving us the “kid version” of please don’t go (quickly forgotten by an Easter basket discussion!) They are my comic relief, my real, my true North. They are also part of the Boston history — tomorrow is as much closure for them, as it is to many of the runners. To see their mom with joyful tears, not ones of sorrow — that will be victory. Happy Easter, Maiz & Wills.
— Demi Clark

Thinking of our daughters today on Easter. This is them yesterday — giving us the “kid version” of please don’t go (quickly forgotten by an Easter basket discussion!) They are my comic relief, my real, my true North. They are also part of the Boston history — tomorrow is as much closure for them, as it is to many of the runners. To see their mom with joyful tears, not ones of sorrow — that will be victory. Happy Easter, Maiz & Wills.

— Demi Clark

This is my daughter Willa. This time last year she was just sitting down to finally eat dinner in our crowded hotel eatery with her sister and father — six hours after I finished, and what seemed like an eternity from normal.
Her life had forever changed after seeing what she saw at the finish line.
Today, she is smiling with her stuffed animals and making jokes. She is laughing. She is excited about her 8th birthday next month. And her mother is inspired by her innocent grace. It shows that we can be resilient at any age — malleable and flexible to what life throws at us.  She inspires me every day. She’s forever Boston Strong.
— Demi Clark

This is my daughter Willa. This time last year she was just sitting down to finally eat dinner in our crowded hotel eatery with her sister and father — six hours after I finished, and what seemed like an eternity from normal.

Her life had forever changed after seeing what she saw at the finish line.

Today, she is smiling with her stuffed animals and making jokes. She is laughing. She is excited about her 8th birthday next month. And her mother is inspired by her innocent grace. It shows that we can be resilient at any age — malleable and flexible to what life throws at us.  She inspires me every day. She’s forever Boston Strong.

— Demi Clark

Reflections At The Beach

Right after Boston, I moved my family to Charleston, SC. It was one part being recruited by a mentor; one part “life’s too short, we’re not waiting anymore.”

That has been a theme this year. I don’t allow myself to say “no” to things that are potential “no second chances.” I hug my children tighter at bedtime (and I don’t miss a chance to tuck them in — EVER — something I used to do). 

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We’re coming up on the year anniversary on Tuesday, and this is a week of strength.

We took the kids to the beach today (on what is normally my long-run Sunday! Thank you, taper!). It’s a beautiful, crystal-clear day here in the south. I watched my daughters walk up the dunes with their sun hats on and said my thanks to God. How could I not?

A family is without their beloved child after April 15th, and I walked away with both of my children unscathed (and myself and my husband). For weeks, I had guilt about that. I would have traded places with that little boy — Martin — a million times over. A child.

In the last year, I’ve learned that I can’t change what happened. I can learn from it, teach others and grow stronger. That’s how we survive as a culture and keep moving forward. We will always remember. We can never forget. But we must also give thanks every moment for what’s right in front of us.

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— Demi Clark